Fatal Fashion

Fatal fashion: new label dangling over the U.S. clothing industry

Fatal Fashionfollowing a deadly fire and a building collapse that killed more than 1,200 garment factory workers in Bangladesh in recent months.

“I don’t ever buy anything that says ‘Made in China.’ It doesn’t work for me,” said Lorna Belden, browsing the racks on a recent weekday at the Cotton Club store in midtown Sacramento.

The tragedies in November and April ripped open the unseemly side of the global clothing supply chain, …

Global sellers such as Wal-Mart are signing on with groups like LaborVoices that promise to get more candid assessments of factory conditions. Bangladesh’s government is being prodded by the United States and others to beef up worker safety. U.S. clothing companies are working on a new labeling system that will track a garment’s manufacturing history.

And many consumers are starting to take a closer look at where their clothing comes from.

“I don’t ever buy anything that says ‘Made in China.’ It doesn’t work for me,” said Lorna Belden, browsing the racks on a recent weekday at the Cotton Club store in midtown Sacramento.

Wearing a green L.L. Bean top made in Peru and a summery scarf from India, the retired dietitian from Davis said it’s often impossible to find non-China labels in large stores.

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