Members Lunch: Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008


When: Thu, Aug 11th 2011 11:30 am to 1:00 pm
Where: New World Saigon Hotel, Ho Chi MInh City

Join AmCham members and guests to learn about developing “safety” as a selling point – testing to guarantee product safety of your exports to the U.S.

Please click this link to Register Online

Event Background

In 2007, a string of product recalls involving toothpaste, tires, and pet food containing contaminated ingredients from China caused U.S. consumers to question the safety of imported products, especially from China. Public confidence in federal oversight of imports sank further in June when toymaker RC2 recalled Thomas and Friends toys for having lead paint, a toxic substance that most people thought had been banished from toys in the 1970s.

Mattel recalled more than 20 million products, including Barbie, Elmo and Dora toys, because they were coated in lead or contained small, dangerous magnets.

In response, both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate approved, and the President signed legislation with far-reaching changes to the U.S. product safety system, with provisions that would require retailers and manufacturers to be more vigilant about product safety.

The biggest change is likely to be a better-staffed Consumer Product Safety Commission, with more enforcement power. Both bills would boost funding for the agency and increase employees, which are less than 400, fewer than half the number it had in 1980.

Event schedule

11:30 Registration and Refreshments
12:00p Lunch is served
12:30p Introduction and Welcome: Chairman, AmCham Vietnam
.Remarks: U.S. Product Safety Commission
.Questions & Answer Period
13:00p Event ends

Costs

Member: $US 30/ea. w/ reservation Non-member/Walk-in: $US 40/ea

Please click this link to Register Online

About the speakers

Richard O''Brien U.S. Consumer Product SafetyRichard W. O’Brien, Director of International Programs and Intergovernmental Affairs
U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

A career federal employee with over 24 years service, Mr. O’Brien draws from a diverse government and private sector background. At the Consumer Product Safety Commission, he oversees the regulatory agency’s international activities aimed at ensuring the safety of imported consumer products.

He also coordinates efforts with other U.S. and foreign government agencies on international consumer product safety issues.

Jeffrey HilsgenJeff Hilsgen joined the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) in 2010 as the agency’s Attaché in Beijing, with additional responsibility as Regional Director for the Asia-Pacific region. He works with product safety regulators in China and other Asian nations to ensure the timely exchange of critical regulator-to-regulator information. He provides guidance and technical support to the private sector (including manufacturers, importers and industry organizations) to improve compliance with U.S. consumer product safety regulations. And he promotes public awareness of consumer product safety issues and trends, while highlighting CPSC initiatives to boost consumer product safety.

Please click this link to Register Online

About the U.S. Consumer Product Saftey Commission

About the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from more than 15,000 types of consumer products under the agency’s jurisdiction. Deaths, injuries and property damage from consumer product incidents cost the nation more than $ 800 billion annually. The CPSC is committed to protecting consumers and families from products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard or can injure children. The CPSC’s work to ensure the safety of consumer products – such as toys, cribs, power tools, cigarette lighters, and household chemicals – contributed significantly to the 30 percent decline in the rate of deaths and injuries associated with consumer products over the past 30 years.

How diethylene glycol was discovered in toothpaste made in China Setting off a worldwide hunt for tainted toothpaste that turned out to be manufactured in China. Health alerts have now been issued in 34 countries, from Vietnam to Kenya, from Tonga in the Pacific to Turks and Caicos in the Caribbean. Canada found 24 contaminated brands and New Zealand found 16. Japan had 20 million tubes. Officials in the United States unwittingly gave the toothpaste to prisoners, the mentally disabled and troubled youths. Hospitals gave it to the sick, while high-end hotels gave it to the wealthy.

Mattel recalls toys made in China “This is a vendor plant with whom we’ve worked for 15 years; this isn’t somebody that just started making toys for us,” Robert Eckert, the chief executive of Mattel, said Wednesday. “They understand our regulations; they understand our program, and something went wrong. That hurts.”

U.S. Interagency Working Group on Import Safety to Hold Public Meeting Formed in response to the concerns about health and safety problems related to imports of pet food, tooth paste, and toys from China.

U.S. Import Safety Working Group Points to Technology and Manufacturing Quality The group’s strategic plan will include measures to improve safety by boosting manufacturing quality, using technology to inspect more goods at ports rather than in faraway labs and ensuring that exporting countries understand U.S. safety standards.

New Consumer Products Safety Legislation in the U.S. Exporting consumer products to the USA? The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) overses the safety of 15,000 consumer products, including toys. Learn about the new CPSC Reform Act, designed to rebuild and reinvigorate the agency after shortcomings were highlighted by recalls of many products made in China. The new legislation will empower the agency to better protect consumers and their families from unsafe products and meet the challenges of today’s economy. Key elements of the legislation emphasize resources, product testing, disclosure and accountability.

U.S. Senate strengthens Consumer Product Safety Agency Starting in March 2007, a string of recalls involving toothpaste, tires and pet food containing contaminated ingredients from China caused U.S. consumers to question product safety. Public confidence in federal oversight of imports sank further in June when toymaker RC2 recalled Thomas and Friends toys for having lead paint, a toxic substance that most people thought had been banished from toys in the 1970s. In September Mattel recalled more than 20 million products, including Barbie, Elmo and Dora toys, because they were coated in lead or contained small, dangerous magnets.